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Baltic Sea cruiseferries

The Baltic Sea is crossed by several cruiseferry lines Some important shipping companies are Viking Line, Silja Line, Tallink, St Peter Line, Eckerö Line and Birka Line Contents 1 Eastern Baltic 11 Tax-free sales 2 Accidents 3 References 31 Notes 32 Bibliography 4 External links Eastern Balticedit Silja Line and Viking Line operate competing cruiseferries on the routes Stockholm - Turku and Stockholm - Helsinki, calling in Åland Mariehamn or Långnäs Additionally, Tallink sails Stockholm - Mariehamn - Tallinn and Stockholm - Riga Tallink, Viking Line and Eckerö Line compete on the...

Dead zone (ecology)

Dead zones are hypoxic low-oxygen areas in the world's oceans and large lakes, caused by "excessive nutrient pollution from human activities coupled with other factors that deplete the oxygen required to support most marine life in bottom and near-bottom water NOAA"2 In the 1970s oceanographers began noting increased instances of dead zones These occur near inhabited coastlines, where aquatic life is most concentrated The vast middle portions of the oceans, which naturally have little life, are not considered "dead zones" In March 2004, when the recently established UN Environment Programme pu...

Eutrophication

Eutrophication Greek: eutrophia from eu "well" + trephein "nourish"; German: Eutrophie, or more precisely hypertrophication, is the depletion of oxygen in a water body, which kills aquatic animals It is a response to the addition of excess nutrients, mainly phosphates, which induces explosive growth of plants and algae, the decaying of which consumes oxygen from the water1 One example is the "bloom" or great increase of phytoplankton in a water body as a response to increased levels of nutrients Eutrophication is almost always induced by the discharge of phosphate-containing detergents, fertil...

Phytoplankton

Phytoplankton /ˌfaɪtoʊˈplæŋktən/ are the autotrophic self-feeding components of the plankton community and a key part of oceans, seas and freshwater basin ecosystems The name comes from the Greek words φυτόν phyton, meaning "plant", and πλαγκτός planktos, meaning "wanderer" or "drifter"1 Most phytoplankton are too small to be individually seen with the unaided eye However, when present in high enough numbers, some varieties may be noticeable as colored patches on the water surface due to the presence of chlorophyll within their cells and accessory pigments such as phycobiliproteins or xanthoph...

Baltic Sea hypoxia

Baltic Sea hypoxia refers to low levels of oxygen in bottom waters, also known as hypoxia, occurring regularly in the Baltic Sea The total area of bottom covered with hypoxic waters with oxygen concentrations less than 2 mg/l in the Baltic Sea has averaged 49,000 km2 over the last 40 years1 The ultimate cause of hypoxia is excess nutrient loading from human activities causing algal blooms The blooms sink to the bottom and use oxygen to decompose at a rate faster than it can be added back into the system through the physical processes of mixing The lack of oxygen anoxia kills bottom-living...

Basking shark

The basking shark Cetorhinus maximus is the second largest living fish, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating sharks along with the whale shark and megamouth shark Adults typically reach 6–8 m 20–26 ft in length They are usually greyish-brown, with mottled skin The caudal fin has a strong lateral keel and a crescent shape The basking shark is a cosmopolitan migratory species, found in all the world's temperate oceans A slow-moving filter feeder, its common name derives from its habit of feeding at the surface, appearing to be basking in the warmer water there It has...

Functional extinction

Functional extinction is the extinction of a species or other taxon such that: it disappears from the fossil record, or historic reports of its existence cease;1 the reduced population no longer plays a significant role in ecosystem function;2 or the population is no longer viable There are no individuals able to reproduce, or the small population of breeding individuals will not be able to sustain itself due to inbreeding depression and genetic drift, which leads to a loss of fitness In plant populations, self-incompatibility mechanisms may cause related plant specimens to be incompatible, ...

Gray whale

The gray whale Eschrichtius robustus,1 also known as the grey whale,3 gray back whale, Pacific gray whale, or California gray whale4 is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds yearly It reaches a length of 149 meters 49 ft, a weight of 36 tonnes 40 short tons, and lives between 55 and 70 years5 The common name of the whale comes from the gray patches and white mottling on its dark skin6 Gray whales were once called devil fish because of their fighting behavior when hunted7 The gray whale is the sole living species in the genus Eschrichtius, which in turn is the s...

Humpback whale

The humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae is a species of baleen whale One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12–16 m 39–52 ft and weigh about 36,000 kg 79,000 lb The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with long pectoral fins and a knobbly head It is known for breaching and other distinctive surface behaviors, making it popular with whale watchers Males produce a complex song lasting 10 to 20 minutes, which they repeat for hours at a time Its purpose is not clear, though it may have a role in mating Found in oceans and seas around the world, hump...

Fin whale

The fin whale Balaenoptera physalus, also called the finback whale, razorback, or common rorqual, is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder of baleen whales It is the second-largest animal after the blue whale7 The largest reportedly grow to 273 m 896 ft long8 with a maximum confirmed length of 259 m 85 ft,9 a maximum recorded weight of nearly 74 tonnes 73 long tons; 82 short tons,10 and a maximum estimated weight of around 114 tonnes 112 long tons; 126 short tons American naturalist Roy Chapman Andrews called the fin whale "the greyhound of the sea for its beautiful, sl...

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